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Songkran

New Year’s celebrations in Thailand take place from the 13th to the 15th of April. The Songkran festival I experienced in Bangkok wasn’t exactly spiritual and religious (the water is originally meant as a symbol of washing all of the bad away and the use of chalk refers to the way blessings are marked by monks), but it was a lot of fun. Get yourself a water-gun and go play with everyone but be ready to be soaked and covered with chalk.

Mystic stones


Goa Gajah’s cave (9th century), around Ubud (Bali)


Goa Gajah, Ubud (Bali)


My Son sanctuary (ruins from the 7th century), around Hoi An (Vietnam)


Imperial city in Hue (Vietnam)


Sukhothai historical park (13th and 14th century) in Thailand


Monkey forest, Ubud (Bali)

Holy thai

Theravada or Hinayana Buddhism is the national religion of Thailand (faith of 95% of the population) but there is total religious freedom and both the king and the governement support all the religions.
Temples and representations of Buddha are ubiquitous in Thai society and represent a real delight for the eyes.


Wat Thep Sirin


Wat Phra Chetuphon, also known as Wat Pho. The oldest and largest temple in Bangkok


The reclining Buddha in Wat Pho (46 meters long and 15 meters high)


Wat Pho


Around Wat Phra Kaew


In the ruins of Sukhothai, capital of an early kingdom (from 1238 to 1438)

Yummy Thaï

In Thailand, you can find lots of different things to eat in the street : fried rice with pork, noodle soup, meat skewers, sticky rice, fried bananas, fruit shakes… and so many other things I don’t know how to rename…
Everyting will cost you just a few bahts (the average price is 30 baht : 0.70€)

I was not expecting that this “waffle skewer” to contain a sausage but it was actually quite good!

Garlic and fish.

Coke and “snack fries”.